WEEKEND READS

Keeping the gears going, staying open to new ideas, finding common experiential threads in humanity, enriching one's travels or traveling without leaving home; the reasons we read are many. Here are the books our faculty and staff are reading right now.

 
 
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Tiny Homes on THE MOVE, WHEELS AND WATER

Lloyd Kahn

Home sweet home is explored with a high-spirited fist pump as Lloyd Kahn takes us into the homes of creative thinkers and adventure seekers. Unbridled by the notion that a home should look a certain way, these modern nomads challenge us to see other ways of living.

Who's reading this? Gabriel Cohen

 
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Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

Yuval Noah Harari

In the past century, humans have curbed war, famine and plague. But, for the first time, humans are now dying from eating too much instead of too little, more people die from old age than from infectious diseases and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers?

Who's reading this? Meinir Davies

 
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FINDING FIBONACCI: THE quest to rediscover the forgotten mathematical genius who changed the world

Keith Devlin

Fibonacci, a medieval mathematician, helped to revive the West as the cradle of science, technology, and commerce, yet he vanished from the pages of history. Keith Devlin, a Yale professor, takes us on his 10-year quest to find this lost Italian thinker, with the highs and lows, lucky chances, chance encounters and breakthroughs he finds along the way.

Who's reading this? Meinir Davies

 
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WHAT A PLANT KNOWS: A FIELD GUIDE TO THE SENSES

DANIEL CHAMOVITZ

Can an orchid feel jet lagged? Does a tomato plant feel pain when you pluck fruit from its vines? And does your fern at home care whether you play Bach or the Beatles? Combining research with lively storytelling, biologist Daniel Chamovitz explores how plants experience our shared Earth – through sight, smell, touch, hearing, memory, and even awareness.

Who's reading this? Gabriel Cohen

 
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THE HIDDEN HALF OF NATURE: THE MICROBIAL ROOTS OF LIFE AND HEALTH

David R. Montgomery

Plant roots. Your gut. These two seemingly unrelated networks have one very crucial thing in common: an armada of bacteria that's absolutely essential for health. But when this bacteria (or gut microbiome) goes awry, our health can go with it. This revelation leads to a radical reconceptualization of our relationship to the natural world: by cultivating beneficial microbes, we can rebuild soil fertility and help turn back the modern plague of chronic diseases. The Hidden Half of Nature outlines how we can evolve agriculture and healing— by merging ecology, gardening and medicine. 

Who's reading this? Kyle Walenga

 
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AFFLUENCE WITHOUT ABUNDANCE: THE DISAPPEARING WORLD OF THE BUSHMEN

JAMES SUZMAN

Affluence Without Abundance is not simply a description of Bushman life. Mr Suzman deftly weaves his experiences and observations with lessons on human evolution, the history of human migration and the fate of African communities since the arrival of Europeans. The overarching aim of the book is more ambitious still: to challenge the reader's ideas about both hunter-gatherer life and human nature.” –  The Economist

Who's reading this? Meinir Davies

 
 
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SHOP CLASS AS SOULCRAFT

matthew crawdford

"Matthew Crawford was on what most people would think was the "right track." Then he left his job as executive director at a think tank in Washington to open a motorcycle repair shop. In his new book, Shop Class as Soulcraft, he makes the case that our society has placed too great a value on white-collar work and not enough value on the trades." –  NPR

Who's reading this? Gabriel Cohen

 
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The great american orchestra: finding the origins of music in the world's wild places

bernie krause

“Krause has become one of the world’s most outspoken—and unusual—environmentalists….This book movingly conveys his anger at the unseen toll that human-generated noise has exacted on the natural world—and why that matters.”—Paul Mitchinson, Washington Post

Who's reading this? Meinir Davies