COLLABORATIONS

We see ourselves as a hybrid. We're a school and a hub for sharing ideas and connecting with people who are making positive change happen around the world. Read about our developing history of collaborations below.

 
 In April 2018, Political Officer Holly Metcalf, Economic Officer Brian Hoyt and Australian Deputy Head of Mission Andrea Carlo Biggi recently met with 13 high school students from @theNewVillageSchool of California who had just returned from volunteering on the island of Lesvos. The group discussed how the U.S. and Australia have contributed to supporting the challenges that Greece has faced in dealing with the decade-long migrant and economic crisis. The students were in Greece as a part of the “Blue Heart Project”, an educational program created and organized by Ms. Eleni Atsikbasis. The program gathers youth from across the globe to establish life-long connections, movement of knowledge and bilateral exchanges together with Mission Blue’s Global Hope Spot network. Atsikbasis also founded “Healing Lesvos”, an initiative aimed to protect and conserve our ocean, and to inspire sustainable development solutions for local communities closely linked to the sea.  As a result of this initiative, the New Village School will sponsor two students from Lesvos for a 6-week exchange in San Francisco, CA and together with Healing Lesvos will prepare a joint rally on  #WorldOceansDay  on June 8 to raise awareness against the threats to our oceans. See more at the  U.S. Embassy of Athens Facebook page .

In April 2018, Political Officer Holly Metcalf, Economic Officer Brian Hoyt and Australian Deputy Head of Mission Andrea Carlo Biggi recently met with 13 high school students from @theNewVillageSchool of California who had just returned from volunteering on the island of Lesvos. The group discussed how the U.S. and Australia have contributed to supporting the challenges that Greece has faced in dealing with the decade-long migrant and economic crisis. The students were in Greece as a part of the “Blue Heart Project”, an educational program created and organized by Ms. Eleni Atsikbasis. The program gathers youth from across the globe to establish life-long connections, movement of knowledge and bilateral exchanges together with Mission Blue’s Global Hope Spot network. Atsikbasis also founded “Healing Lesvos”, an initiative aimed to protect and conserve our ocean, and to inspire sustainable development solutions for local communities closely linked to the sea.

As a result of this initiative, the New Village School will sponsor two students from Lesvos for a 6-week exchange in San Francisco, CA and together with Healing Lesvos will prepare a joint rally on #WorldOceansDay on June 8 to raise awareness against the threats to our oceans. See more at the U.S. Embassy of Athens Facebook page.

 On June 8, 2018, to celebrate  #worldoceansday , nearly 100 adults and children from the Bay Area gathered together in Sausalito to celebrate with iced tea, lemonade, cookies and bouquets — the latter of which were carried to a nearby beach and collectively tied to a seven-foot tall bamboo heart. A similar celebration jointly occurred in Greece earlier in the day, with a twin heart covered in the flora of their locale. The dual flower-covered hearts are symbolic of the blue hearts that represent the  #hopespots  of  Mission Blue . The purpose of this joint event was to raise awareness for protecting our oceans. To cap off the celebration, Oscar award-winning director Louie Psihoyos joined our efforts and reminded us that social change happens when 10 percent of the population is committed to protecting our planet 100 percent of the time. Which means, small, dedicated groups of people can and do make waves of positive change happen.   

On June 8, 2018, to celebrate #worldoceansday, nearly 100 adults and children from the Bay Area gathered together in Sausalito to celebrate with iced tea, lemonade, cookies and bouquets — the latter of which were carried to a nearby beach and collectively tied to a seven-foot tall bamboo heart. A similar celebration jointly occurred in Greece earlier in the day, with a twin heart covered in the flora of their locale. The dual flower-covered hearts are symbolic of the blue hearts that represent the #hopespots of Mission Blue. The purpose of this joint event was to raise awareness for protecting our oceans. To cap off the celebration, Oscar award-winning director Louie Psihoyos joined our efforts and reminded us that social change happens when 10 percent of the population is committed to protecting our planet 100 percent of the time. Which means, small, dedicated groups of people can and do make waves of positive change happen.

 

MISSION BLUE AND SETTING FORTH HOPE

During our 2017 - 2018 school year, we were humbled and excited to connect to Mission Blue, which inspires action to explore and protect the ocean. Led by legendary oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle, Mission Blue is uniting a global coalition to inspire an upwelling of public awareness, access and support for a worldwide network of marine protected areas – Hope Spots. Under Dr. Earle’s leadership, the Mission Blue team implements communications campaigns that elevate Hope Spots to the world stage through documentaries, social media, traditional media and innovative tools like Google Earth. Mission Blue also embarks on regular oceanic expeditions that shed light on these vital ecosystems and build support for their protection. Currently, the Mission Blue alliance includes more than 200 respected ocean conservation groups and like-minded organizations, from large multinational companies to individual scientific teams doing important research. Additionally, Mission Blue supports the work of conservation NGOs that share the mission of building public support for ocean protection. With the concerted effort and passion of people and organizations around the world, Hope Spots can become a reality and form a global network of marine protected areas large enough to restore the ocean, the blue heart of the planet.

 
 In their own words: The declaration of intention and action was created with the 32 activist students at Now Is The Time San Francisco.

In their own words: The declaration of intention and action was created with the 32 activist students at Now Is The Time San Francisco.

 Sister cities: A student ambassador from the New Village School met with over 40 youth leaders at Punahou School for Now Is The Time Honolulu.

Sister cities: A student ambassador from the New Village School met with over 40 youth leaders at Punahou School for Now Is The Time Honolulu.

EXPLORINg UNDERSTANDING, IDENTITY AND PERCEPTION

In December 2016, we created and held a youth conference, Now Is The Time, with middle and high school students from the San Francisco Bay Area. It was a two-day exploration of effective altruism with visiting collaborators Natasha Deganello Giraudie, Founder and Creative Director of Micro-Documentaries, a social innovation film production company; Sherwin Das, Senior Fellow for Program on Conflict, Climate Change and Green Development, UC Berkeley, and Ernesto A. Reyes, Youth Leadership Program Manager for Bioneers

Students began by exploring what a circle of concern is, how we each have one, and who and what is included and excluded when we choose to give. Students also discussed ethical decision-making and how solving complex problems is often times getting most of it right, not all of it right. Students also explored the concept that progress is made even if you cannot find or work on the entire solution at once. After lunch and a jam session, students reconvened to take a deep dive into how identity influences our perceptions of ourselves and others. In the end, they shared what they learned, which was created into a shareable graphic (see above).

Six months later, a New Village School staff member and high school student ambassador met with over 40 students at Punahou School in Honolulu to bring the abbreviated half-day version of Now Is The Time Honolulu. Using Skype, the students gathered the darkened classroom of Ian Earle to Skype with Natasha, Sherwin, his UC Berkeley colleague David Gettinger and Ernesto on a large screen. Students explored how to start where you are and why we choose who to accept into our circles of concern; how background and perspective can affect and deflect conflict; how people might not be what they appear to be; how people often identify with more than one identity and how identity can bring people together and apart. In an effort to link the two events, Malgosia Kostecka from The Grove in San Francisco created a sister graphic to capture the experience (see above).

 
 The Hokule'a canoe, officially a Hawai'i state treasure, returned home to Honolulu's Magic Island, Saturday, June 17, 2017, after being away for over three years. Sewing a "lei of peace and compassion," the canoe visited 150 ports around the world.  Photo: Myles Cohen, NVS student.

The Hokule'a canoe, officially a Hawai'i state treasure, returned home to Honolulu's Magic Island, Saturday, June 17, 2017, after being away for over three years. Sewing a "lei of peace and compassion," the canoe visited 150 ports around the world. Photo: Myles Cohen, NVS student.

 The Hokule'a is a double-hulled sailing canoe was greeted with chants and cheers — and its crew members with lei, hugs and tears. Using the stars, wind and water, the crew guided her 40,000 nautical miles to 26 nations.  Photo: Myles Cohen, NVS student.

The Hokule'a is a double-hulled sailing canoe was greeted with chants and cheers — and its crew members with lei, hugs and tears. Using the stars, wind and water, the crew guided her 40,000 nautical miles to 26 nations. Photo: Myles Cohen, NVS student.

HEALING THE PAST, MOVING FORWARD TOGETHER

“When we learned about Nainoa Thompson, the Hōkūleʻa crew and the mission of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, we knew we had found kindred souls. Our school was grown to give opportunities to students to understand the past and the repercussions of behaviors that influence our present so they can navigate in a completely new way toward a future that has the agency to affect positively,” said Meinir Davies, head of the New Village School.

And so began our outreach to this very special crew.

By connecting to the Miki Tomita of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, a NVS high school student was able to apply to and was selected for the Mālama Honua Youth Summit, held on June 18, 2017, in Honolulu, Hawai'i, and created in partnership with the World Youth Congress. Miki believes the voyage can inspire leadership and resilience in the communities by engaging youth and learners of all ages, so that everyone together can help create a brighter tomorrow for Hawai'i and the world. Students from over 100 nations attended the summit.

You can read more about the collaboration between the Polynesian Voyaging Society and New Village School.

 
 Bioneers Youth Leadership Program combines learning, leadership development, alliance building, intergenerational collaboration and honest dialogue. The New Village School is proud to continually collaborate with the program.

Bioneers Youth Leadership Program combines learning, leadership development, alliance building, intergenerational collaboration and honest dialogue. The New Village School is proud to continually collaborate with the program.

 New Village School high school students were part of the Youth Leadership Program at the Bioneers Conference in October 2016.  Photo credit: Bioneers

New Village School high school students were part of the Youth Leadership Program at the Bioneers Conference in October 2016. Photo credit: Bioneers

HUMANS AND NATURE WORKING TOGETHER

Last fall, the New Village School connected with the Bioneers to bring peer-to-peer environmental engagement and deep human development for our high school students. This partnership, which helps strengthen collective efforts for ecological balance, sustainability, social justice and diversity, has been an inspiring, high-spirited, and intellectual-and-practical collaboration. The cross-pollination of ideas and adeptness of the Bioneers team to bring people together to explore and find radically needed (and often elegantly simple) solutions to our most pressing and complex social problems was a gift to our students and is hope for our collective future.

The future looks bright.

Thank you, Bioneers.

Read more about this year's upcoming Bioneers Conference and Youth Leadership Program.